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Pandemic, war and ‘crazy’ prices threaten South African pivot from coal

Pandemic, war and ‘crazy’ prices threaten South African pivot from coal

PROMIT MUKHERJEE SOUTH Africa, where daily blackouts are a fact of life, knows better than most that it cannot rely on coal power. But just when its plans to shift to renewable energy to help drive Africa's most industrialised economy were gaining momentum, rising costs linked to the pandemic and the war in Ukraine threaten further delay. After a six-year hiatus, the country in 2021 held a bidding round for companies to operate wind and solar projects, attracting aggressive offers from more than 100 renewables companies, eager to make up for the shortfalls of state power generator Eskom. The winners…
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Africa looks likely to continue relying on power from fossil fuels for some time

Africa looks likely to continue relying on power from fossil fuels for some time

THE narratives of “leapfrogging” to new technologies are pervasive when it comes to development in Africa. One example is skipping cord phones and landlines to advance directly from limited phone coverage to wide mobile phone usage. Another that’s frequently discussed is Africa’s potential for a quick transition to renewable energy. GALINA ALOVA, Environmental Economist | Energy, Sustainable Finance and Machine Learning, University of Oxford PHILIPP TROTTER, Research Associate, Renewable Energy, University of Oxford This is important both from a climate change and an economic development perspective. Providing affordable clean energy is big on the UN Sustainable Development Agenda (Goal 7).…
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Winners of ‘Green Nobel’ fight deforestation, coal power

Winners of ‘Green Nobel’ fight deforestation, coal power

ANASTASIA MOLONEY AS a teenage mother and activist, Liz Chicaje would travel by boat and foot across Peru's Amazon rainforest with her young daughter campaigning to protect the ancestral lands of the Bora indigenous people from illegal logging and mining. To preserve the forest that the Bora and other indigenous people depend on for hunting and fishing in Peru's northeastern region of Loreto, Chicaje spearheaded the creation of a two-million-acre (809,370-hectare) national park. On Tuesday, Chicaje's activism and leadership earned her a prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize - known as the "Green Nobel" - which honors grassroots activism, along with five…
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