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Archaeological site along the Nile opens a window on the Nubian civilization that flourished in ancient Sudan

Archaeological site along the Nile opens a window on the Nubian civilization that flourished in ancient Sudan

CIRCULAR mounds of rocks dot the desert landscape at the archaeological site of Tombos in northern Sudan. They reveal tumuli – the underground burial tombs used at least as far back as 2500 B.C. by ancient inhabitants who called this region Kush or Nubia. As a bioarchaeologist who excavates and analyzes human skeletal remains along with their related grave goods, I’ve been working at Tombos for more than 20 years. Author MICHELE R. BUZON, Professor of Anthropology, Purdue University Discussions about ancient history in Africa are dominated by the rise of Egypt. But there were several societies that rose to…
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The Grand Renaissance Dam: what’s at stake and what could break the deadlock

The Grand Renaissance Dam: what’s at stake and what could break the deadlock

MAHEMUD TEKUYA, JSD/Ph.D candidate, University of the Pacific The Ethiopian Grand Renaissance Dam is inching closer to completion, rekindling the environmental and political controversies that have dogged the project from the start nearly 10 years ago. In addition, recent satellite images show a steady increase in the amount of water being held back by the new mega dam. Mahemud Tekuya explains what’s at stake. The current dispute over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is directly linked to colonial-era Nile treaties. During the scramble for Africa, controlling the source of the Nile was a major colonial goal for the British. In…
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Severe flooding in South Sudan displaces more than 600,000 – U.N.

Severe flooding in South Sudan displaces more than 600,000 – U.N.

DENIS DUMO  SEVERE flooding in South Sudan has forced more than 600,000 people to flee their homes since July, the United Nations said, after months of torrential rains caused the Nile to burst its banks. The impoverished East African nation is struggling to recover from a five-year civil war and was already suffering severe food shortages. Scientists say the unusual rains are caused by a cyclical weather pattern that has been exacerbated by climate change. The coronavirus pandemic is also complicating the response, said United Nations humanitarian coordinator for South Sudan Alain Noudéhou. Costs for delivering aid have risen with…
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