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Decolonising Shakespeare: setting Othello in Ghana and Pericles in Glasgow

Decolonising Shakespeare: setting Othello in Ghana and Pericles in Glasgow

Authors HENRY BELL, Senior Lecturer in Performance, University of the West of Scotland STEPHEN COLLINS, Lecturer, University of the West of Scotland OVER the last few years, the issue of decolonising the curriculum has become a growing concern for UK universities. This means recognising the legacy of western colonialism and rethinking the way we teach and research. Decolonising Shakespeare, with its historic links to English national identity, language and culture is a particularly knotty challenge. Shakespeare was writing in a country that had begun to trade in slaves just two years before his birth, and the racist attitudes that enabled…
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Pope, using Shakespeare, makes climate change appeal

Pope, using Shakespeare, makes climate change appeal

PHILLIP PULLELLA Pope Francis adapted Shakespeare's famous Hamlet quote in an appeal to people not to remain blind to the destruction of climate change and the mass migration it may cause, writing: "To see or not to see, that is the question." Francis went on to urge people to work together to protect "creation, our common home" and not "hunker down" in individualism, in the preface of a document by the Vatican development office on the pastoral care of people displaced by climactic events. "I suggest we adapt Hamlet's famous 'to be or not to be' and affirm: 'To see…
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