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It’s imperative that South Africa moves fast on state capture prosecutions. Here’s why

It’s imperative that South Africa moves fast on state capture prosecutions. Here’s why

SINCE the dying days of apartheid in the mid-1990s, and at several pivotal moments since, South Africans have yearned for some measure of accountability for the ravages of apartheid. After all, the end of a system declared a crime against humanity by the United Nations had to yield an inevitable reckoning and accountability, especially for its victims. Author PENELOPE ANDREWS, Professor of Law, New York Law School The first opportunity for accountability for apartheid crimes in democratic South Africa came with the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), released in 1998 and 2003. The universal expectation was that…
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Book sheds light on apartheid South Africa’s hidden massacre

Book sheds light on apartheid South Africa’s hidden massacre

APPALLING atrocities occurred under the flag of apartheid as the white minority government sought to impose a racist system on the majority of South African citizens. Many of the atrocities were subsequently investigated by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and are now seared into public memory. MIGNONNE BREIER, Honorary Research Associate, School of Education, University of Cape Town But not all. One of the more notable gaps in the country’s collective memory is a massacre that took place in 1952. It was never officially investigated and few people know about it. I set about trying to rectify this in my…
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Fighting for Black women’s rights

Fighting for Black women’s rights

JOYCE PILISO-SEROKE ACTIVIST and community organiser Joyce Piliso-Seroke fought overseas and at home in the struggle against apartheid, eventually joining the Commission for Gender Equality in 1999. I was still working for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) when Thenjiwe Mtintso resigned from the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE) on 1 April 1998 to take up the full-time political position of deputy secretary-general of the ANC. She had completed just two years of her five-year term. Since I had vowed to continue my involvement in South Africa’s transitional process beyond the end of the TRC lifespan, I was excited to…
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