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Five unusual technologies for harvesting water in dry areas

Five unusual technologies for harvesting water in dry areas

MANZOOR QADIR, Assistant Director of the Institute for Water, Environment and Health, United Nations University VLADIMIR SMAKHTIN, Director of the Institute for Water, Environment and Health, United Nations University WATER scarcity is among the top five global risks affecting people’s wellbeing. In water-scarce areas, the situation is grim. Conventional sources like snowfall, rainfall, river runoff and easily accessible groundwater are being affected by climate change, and supplies are shrinking as demand grows. In these countries, water is a critical challenge to sustainable development and a potential cause of social unrest and conflict. Water scarcity also impacts traditional seasonal human migration…
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In a thirsty world, information gaps dog a push to tap groundwater

In a thirsty world, information gaps dog a push to tap groundwater

LAURIE GOERING  AS growing populations and accelerating climate change worsen water scarcity around the world, pumping more from underground could help fill the gap in poorer nations - but only if supplies are better charted and they are used wisely, researchers said. "It's a resource with a huge amount of potential," said Jude Cobbing, who led a new study for charities WaterAid, Earthwatch and WWF on how groundwater is managed in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Nigeria and Ghana. Little is understood about how much groundwater is available, particularly at local level, and poor organisation between government agencies can mean it does…
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